Here is a list of some of the popular types of shopping centers. Have a look:

1. Neighborhood shopping centers
The typical neighborhood shopping center is basically small-sized, consisting from 3 to 12 stores and serving a population of up to 40,000 people who live within a 10-minute drive. The anchor store in these centers is usually a supermarket or a drugstore. Neighborhood shopping centers are usually straight-line strip malls with facilities such as parking in front and serve primarily the regular shopping requirements of consumers in the nearby area.

2. Community shopping centers
Community shopping centers include 12 to 50 stores and serve a population ranging from 40,000 to 150,000 people. The leading tenant often is a large department or variety store, a super drugstore, or a supermarket. Community shopping centers render more clothing and other soft goods than do neighbor- hood shopping centers. Of the eight types of shopping centers, community shopping centers take on the widest variety of shapes, designs, and tenants.

3. Power centers
Power centers include the drawing strength of a large regional mall with the convenience of a neighborhood shopping center. Anchored by several large specialty retailers, including warehouse clubs, discount department stores, or large specialty stores, these centers target older, wealthier baby boomers who want selection and convenience. Anchor stores usually account for 80 percent of power center space, compared with 50 percent in the typical community shopping center. Just as in a shopping mall, small businesses can benefit from the traffic generated by anchor stores, but they must choose their locations carefully so that they are not overshadowed by their larger neighbors.

4. Theme or festival centers
Festival shopping centers employ a unifying theme that individual stores display in their decor and sometimes in the merchandise they sell. Entertainment is a common theme for these shopping centers, which often target tourists. Many festival shopping centers are located in urban areas and are housed in older, sometimes historic buildings that have been renovated to serve as shopping centers.

5. Outlet centers
Outlet centers feature manufacturers’ and retailers’ outlet stores selling name-brand goods at a discount. Unlike most other types of shopping centers, outlet centers typically have no anchor stores; the discounted merchandise they offer draws sufficient traffic. Most outlet centers are open air and are laid out in strips or in clusters, creating small “villages” of shops.

6. Lifestyle centers
Essentially situated near affluent residential neighborhoods where their target customers live, lifestyle centers are designed to look less like shopping centers and malls and more like the busy streets in the central business districts that existed in towns and cities in their heyday. Occupied by many upscale national chain restaurants such as P. F. Chang and specialty stores such as Talbots, Coach, and many others, these centers combine shopping convenience and entertainment ranging from movie theaters and open- air concerts to art galleries and people watching

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